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Charles Kaki Ng drops masterclass on what a reverse entry drift SHOULD look like

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reverse entry drift
Charles Kaki Ng pulls off world's best reverse entry drift

If there’s another video that should be canon on what a reverse drift SHOULD look like, it’s Charles Kaki Ng providing is with a textbook demo of one.

Although Charles Ng isn’t drifting in Formula Drift in the United States that doesn’t mean this FD pro isn’t burning up tires elsewhere. It looks like his latest drift exploits have him drifting for Rydanz Tires in the Formula Drift Championship series and the D1 Grand Prix Series in China. With Round 3. in Qingdao, Ng has been practicing leading up to the event this weekend which brings us to his latest video he shared earlier today (Oct. 17,2018) showing Ng pulling off a textbook reverse entry drift for the ages. Check out his skills below!

In drifting, it’s mostly about the angle, how well you can transition between corners and how clutch you are when tandeming in high-pressure situations. If you can reverse entry drift, you’ve got your car dialed in pretty well and can handle the small changes unique to every corner with ease. It’s not a prerequisite of good drifting, but if you can pull off a reverse entry drift, you’ve at least got superior control over how much angle you can chuck into a corner.

In the video above we can see Ng enter this corner in Qingdao at a high rate of speed, which is needed to maintain enough momentum to pull off this advanced level of drift. Ng then initiates his drift, rotates more than 90 degrees, and more importantly, holds that angle past the initial turn, through the apex, and into the next corner.

Here’s the other video that’s also part of canon on reverse entry drifting by Masato Kawabata. Look how much better Ng’s drift is.

I’m not sure if Ng planned it that way but it sure makes for an exciting drift. Presumably, he can’t do this during a tandem run as he’ll be slamming into his tandem mate but he probably can pull this drift off during qualifying to secure a good lineup leading to competition the next day.

It’s not the most common way to drift and it probably isn’t done often for good reason, you have to get it right or suffer looking like an amateur as you correct mid-corner, but it sure does make for one pretty drift.

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